Westview Elementary

Reading aloud to children of all ages is one of the best ways to help them develop a love of books. It can also be a special time to be shared with children. Reading is the foundation of a successful education. Children improve this all-important ability by reading, reading and reading some more.

Does your child see well? One reason some children do not like to read and do poorly in school is that they have vision problems. Ask your family doctor to check your child’s vision.

Children who see their parents reading usually grow up to be readers themselves. This is one of those times when actions speak louder than words. Talk with your children about why you are reading- for information, to check out something you think you know or maybe just for fun.
If the TV is easy to reach, but books are on the top shelf you can guess how children will choose to spend their time. Make sure books, magazines and newspapers are easy to get.

Reading in unusual places also adds fun. Look for unusual places children can read.
How about outside, under a shady tree? In a sand box or hammock, at a near by park, under a tent made by tossing a sheet over a clothesline or table, in the car during road trips or traffic delays, sitting on a blanket spread on the floor for an indoor reading picnic.
I am certain you have many more creative places to consider.
 

Respectfully,

Tammy Rhoades
Principal

 

Important Dates and Information:

4-16 to 5-2 ISTEP Part II--Math and English Grades 3&4 Science Grade 4 Computers

Test Taking Tips for Students:

* Read the question before you look at the answers.

* Eliminate answers you know aren't right.

* If you do not know the answer, make a smart guess and select an answer.

* Mark your answers carefully.

* Make sure you work at a pace that will give you enough time to finish the test. If you get stuck on a question, move on and come back to it later. Never leave anything blank.

If you have time left, go back and check your answers. Reread the question and ask yourself the following things:

  • “Did I answer the question(s) asked?”
  • “Did I give evidence from the text?”
  • “Does my answer make sense?”
  • “Did I show my work?’
  • “Did I put the answer in the answer blank?”

Test Taking Tips for Parents/Guardians:

* Praise your child for the things he or she does well, and be supportive of his or her efforts, especially in are-as or activities that are challenging. Kids who feel good about themselves and their abilities - and who aren't fearful about making mistakes - will feel more confident and less anxious when taking the test.

* Talk with your child about what they're doing in class and ask what he or she is reading. Studies show that kids who talk with their families on a weekly basis about school and what they read score higher on the na-tional standardized reading test than kids who talk about these things with their families less often.

* Limit your child's TV time. Studies show that kids who watch fewer than three hours of television a day scored higher on the national reading test than those who watch more.

* Express a positive attitude about the test and confidence in your child's ability to do well on it. Research shows that parents' and teachers' attitudes influence children's attitudes. So if you're upbeat and encouraging about the test, your child is likely to feel good about it.

* Encourage your child to read-newspapers, magazines, food labels, recipes, letters, and instructions, in addi-tion to fiction and non-fiction books. Test makers draw on a wide variety of formats when choosing items to evaluate reading comprehension skills.

* Reassure your child that test scores are only one measure of his or her abilities, not the whole picture. Don't judge your child on the basis of his or her test score.

* Ensure that your child gets a good night's sleep the night before the test and eats a nutritious breakfast the day of the test. 8-10 hours of sleep is recommended.

 

 

A few general reminders about procedural items.

Students need to be in class and ready to begin their daily activities at 7:50. Our dismissal time is 2:40 on Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. We dismiss at 1:40 on Tuesday. We need for all our students to be here daily and on time. Attendance is a priority at Westview. Please schedule all appointments after school hours.  

Please remember to drive safely especially during drop off and pick up times. We have many wonderful kids and we need your support to help keep our school safe. If you are in a hurry and do not have time to wait, I suggest that you do not pull into the circle drive. There are alternative drop-off locations available; these options include dropping off your child at the corner or on one of the side streets. If you need to come into the building to talk with one of us, please park your car in a parking spot.  

         When we have a two-hour delay, school will start at 9:50. Breakfast is not served when we are on a two-hour delay. You can access school closings/delays by going to the Richmond Community Schools web site, listening to the radio, or watching television.